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  • Seed systems in Africa south of the Sahara have been a central topic in the public discourse as part of wider conversations on policy options for agriculture and rural development. Although seed systems in the region have followed different development trajectories, they do seem to be affected by political economy, farming system, agroecological, and market development factors that policymakers and stakeholders must address if the systems are to thrive.

  • Venue : Panafric Hotel

    Date : 17th  December 2014

    Climate change is currently one of the major challenges facing the world. This is particularly so for Sub-Saharan Africa, which has minimal capacity to build resilience against its effects. Climate variability and change and associated droughts and floods directly affect agricultural production and food security given that most of the population in Africa lives in the rural areas and relies mainly on rain-fed agriculture for its livelihood. Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development, Egerton University conducted studies on: (i) effects of climate change on household livelihoods, mainly focusing on agricultural income, fertilizer use and diversification, and (ii) uptake of crop insurance among small-scale farmers in Kenya. Assessment of crop insurance uptake was necessary given the role that it plays in providing a mechanism of sharing and transferring residual weather-related risks that traditional risk management measures are unable to handle. It is in the light of this that the Institute organized a workshop where key findings were presented and discussed. The workshop drew participants from a wide spectrum of stakeholders including relevant government ministries, mainly Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Representatives from County governments (Machakos, Embu, Laikipia), Kenya Meteorological Services (KMS), Agriculture and Climate Risk Enterprise (ACRE) - Kilimo Salama, the private sector, farmers and farmer groups/organizations, University of Nairobi and Egerton University- Tegemeo Institute, among others.

    Workshop Proceedings  

  • Tegemeo Institute in conjunction with Latin America based Research Institute GRADE has been conducting a study on Land Tenure in Pastoralist Societies. The focus of the collaborative research has been on land governance with an aim of coming up with policy recommendations that can enhance smallholder livelihoods in both the Andean countries and in the East African region. The study conducted in both regions is on Land Tenure in Pastoralist Societies. In Latin America, the study focuses on Peru while in the East African region, Kenya is the case study.

    The two regions face challenges arising from land governance and while the context is different for the two countries, there are similarities in the lessons that can be drawn for improving land rights that will enhance smallholder livelihoods, particularly that of pastoralists.

    Under the project, each research institution has undertaken a country research paper and jointly, both research centers have conducted a comparative study. The comparative research is based upon the cases of Peru in Latin America and Kenya in East Africa, with some evidence from the other selected countries in both regions.

    Based on the Kenyan study, currently, about 67% of land in Kenya is categorised as community land. This land is mostly characterised by arid and semi-arid climatic conditions such as high temperatures and low rainfall. As such, it is largely occupied by pastoral communities who practice livestock keeping under extensive production systems, which is best, suited for these environs. Since the country promulgated the new constitution in 2010, land laws have changed in line with the constitutional requirements. The community land bill has been under discussion since 2012 and although currently in parliament, the debate over certain clauses in the bill is yet to be resolved. The Tegemeo study examines the evolution of collective land regimes in East Africa and how it affects the communities that live on community land. More specifically, the study looks at drivers and reasons behind the changes in collective land access and how the communities that rely on these tenure systems have been or are likely to be affected.

    The study findings have implications on the current policy debate on protecting communal land. They show that pastoral communities have continued to use customary laws in management of land under collective access with mixed results. Expanding urbanisation, large public investments and potential to change use of land have negatively affected collective land tenure regimes, and hence the sustainability of pastoral systems. Enactment of policies that recognize customary laws, strengthen community mechanisms to enforce land rights and ensure fairness in use of land and resources derived from land will help communities in the maintenance of collective land access regimes, thereby improving the sustainability of pastoralists’ production systems.

    It is evident that inequality in land use played a primary role in changing community’s perceptions about collective access to land. The inequality was brought to fore by changing social dynamics within the communities such as education. Pastoral communities inhabit lands where the ecological environment best suits extensive livestock production systems. To sustain these systems and pastoralist communities’ livelihoods, the study recommends that the following need to be considered:

    1. Inclusion of customary laws in the legal framework to help enforce customary rights used in the management of community land
    2. Need for strengthening of community mechanisms to manage land under collective tenure regimes such as providing semi-formal training and enforcing accountability procedures such as record keeping and holding of annual general meetings.
    3. Need for increased investments in and delivery of public goods in pastoral areas such as infrastructure, schools, hospital, livestock markets and veterinary services.

    See the Narok County Presentation here …

    See the Isiolo County Presentation here …

    See the Narok Workshop Video Proceedings here...

    See the Isiolo Workshop Video Proceedings here …

  • Tegemeo Institute in conjunction with Latin America based Research Institute GRADE has been conducting a study on Land Tenure in Pastoralist Societies. The focus of the collaborative research has been on land governance with an aim of coming up with policy recommendations that can enhance smallholder livelihoods in both the Andean countries and in the East African region. The study conducted in both regions is on Land Tenure in Pastoralist Societies. In Latin America, the study focuses on Peru while in the East African region, Kenya is the case study.

    The two regions face challenges arising from land governance and while the context is different for the two countries, there are similarities in the lessons that can be drawn for improving land rights that will enhance smallholder livelihoods, particularly that of pastoralists.

    Under the project, each research institution has undertaken a country research paper and jointly, both research centers have conducted a comparative study. The comparative research is based upon the cases of Peru in Latin America and Kenya in East Africa, with some evidence from the other selected countries in both regions.

    Based on the Kenyan study, currently, about 67% of land in Kenya is categorised as community land. This land is mostly characterised by arid and semi-arid climatic conditions such as high temperatures and low rainfall. As such, it is largely occupied by pastoral communities who practice livestock keeping under extensive production systems, which is best, suited for these environs. Since the country promulgated the new constitution in 2010, land laws have changed in line with the constitutional requirements. The community land bill has been under discussion since 2012 and although currently in parliament, the debate over certain clauses in the bill is yet to be resolved. The Tegemeo study examines the evolution of collective land regimes in East Africa and how it affects the communities that live on community land. More specifically, the study looks at drivers and reasons behind the changes in collective land access and how the communities that rely on these tenure systems have been or are likely to be affected.

    The study findings have implications on the current policy debate on protecting communal land. They show that pastoral communities have continued to use customary laws in management of land under collective access with mixed results. Expanding urbanisation, large public investments and potential to change use of land have negatively affected collective land tenure regimes, and hence the sustainability of pastoral systems. Enactment of policies that recognize customary laws, strengthen community mechanisms to enforce land rights and ensure fairness in use of land and resources derived from land will help communities in the maintenance of collective land access regimes, thereby improving the sustainability of pastoralists’ production systems.

    It is evident that inequality in land use played a primary role in changing community’s perceptions about collective access to land. The inequality was brought to fore by changing social dynamics within the communities such as education. Pastoral communities inhabit lands where the ecological environment best suits extensive livestock production systems. To sustain these systems and pastoralist communities’ livelihoods, the study recommends that the following need to be considered:

    1. Inclusion of customary laws in the legal framework to help enforce customary rights used in the management of community land
    2. Need for strengthening of community mechanisms to manage land under collective tenure regimes such as providing semi-formal training and enforcing accountability procedures such as record keeping and holding of annual general meetings.
    3. Need for increased investments in and delivery of public goods in pastoral areas such as infrastructure, schools, hospital, livestock markets and veterinary services.

    See the Presentation here …

    See the Workshop Video Proceedings here...

    See more output on the ELLA Program here...

  • Date: 16th March, 2017

    Venue: Ololulung’a Sub County Headquarters, Narok County

    Pastoralism is an extensive form of livestock production that constitutes the main production system found in rangelands, providing livelihoods to an estimated of 500 million people globally. Similar to other parts of the world, the country’s public policy has not always pursued policies that sustain pastoralism. This has been due to misconceptions about pastoralism, competition from other land uses, demographic changes and urbanisation. As such, pastoral communities in Kenya, similar to other parts of the world, are now facing immense pressure on their land.

    Against this backdrop, Tegemeo Institute conducted a study that tracked how land tenure in pastoralist communities had changed. In addition, we were able to compare this evolution with what is happening to pastoral communities in other parts of the world with a view of learning from these experience and drawing lessons that will help pastoral communities sustain their productive systems. We have drawn lessons through interaction with experts from Sub Saharan Africa and Latin America. The findings from this work were disseminated and discussed in a recent workshop as we continue to engage in the debate for sustaining pastoralism. The workshop will brought together government bureaucrats, pastoral communities and other stakeholders working with pastoral communities to deliberate policies and strategies that will improve pastoral communities’ livelihoods and sustain their productive systems.

    See more output here

    Policy Brief... 

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    Workshop Video

    Proceedings

  • Egerton Universitys Tegemeo Institute is a key participant in the 9 th Annual ReNAPRI Stakeholder Conference Looking ahead: “Strengthening Africa’s food system through increased productivity, climate resilience and adaptation” Africa.

  • Theme: Conference on Enhancing Agricultural Competitiveness for Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction
  • Theme: Conference on Integrating Consumers in Policy and Program Agenda in Kenyan Agriculture

    Date: 19th April 2005

    Venue: Safari Park Hotel, Nairobi

    Speeches:


    1. Opening speech by Hon Kipruto Arap Kirwa, MP, Kenya Minister for Agriculture.(pdf)

    2. Opening speech by the Vice chancellor Egerton University.(pdf)

    3. Speech by Chief Agriculture business and Environment office, Usaid Mission to Kenya.(pdf)

    Papers:

    Paper 1. - Wp15-Effects of government maize Marketing trade Policies on maize Market Prices in Kenya by T.S Jayne, Robert J. Meyers and James Nyoro.
    This paper identifies the effects of NCPB's activities and government maize trade policy on maize market price levels and volatility. The paper also identifies the welfare implications and distribution effects of these policies 

    Download the paper (pdf)

    Paper 2. - Wp19-Staple Food Consumption Patterns in Urban Kenya: Trends and Policy Implications: Muyanga M, T.S Jayne, Gem Argwings Kodhek and J Ariga.

    Download the paper (pdf)

  • Theme: Conference on Agricultural inputs and Services: Impacts on Agricultural Productivity, Competitiveness and Food Security


    Date: Thursday 18th May 2006

    Opening Speeches:


    1.Speech by Hon Kipruto Arap Kirwa, MP, Kenya Minister for Agriculture.(pdf)

    2.Speech by Prof James K. Tuitoek, Vice Chancellor Egerton University.(pdf)

    3.Speech by Mr Stephen Haykin, Director Usaid mission to Kenya.(pdf)

    Papers:
    All Papers Abstracts

    1. Factors Driving the Growth in Fertilizer Consumption in Kenya, 1990-2005. Can the Momentum be Sustained? by J. Ariga, T.S. Jayne, and J. Nyoro (pdf)

    2.Rural Financial Services in Kenya: What is Working and Why? by Betty Kibaara. (pdf)

    3.Agricultural Extension in Kenya: Practice and Policy Lessons by Milu Muyanga and T.S. Jayne (pdf)

    4. Beef and Dairy cattle improvement services:A Policy Perspective by Paul Gamba.(pdf)

    5.Enhancing Access and Utilization of Improved Seed for Food Security in Kenya by Miltone Ayieko and David Tschirley (ppt)

    Theme: Conference on Integrating Consumers in Policy and Program Agenda in Kenyan Agriculture

    Date: 19th April 2005

    Venue: Safari Park Hotel, Nairobi

    Speeches:


    1. Opening speech by Hon Kipruto Arap Kirwa, MP, Kenya Minister for Agriculture.(pdf)

    2. Opening speech by the Vice chancellor Egerton University.(pdf)

    3. Speech by Chief Agriculture business and Environment office, Usaid Mission to Kenya.(pdf)

    Papers:

    Paper 1. - Wp15-Effects of government maize Marketing trade Policies on maize Market Prices in Kenya by T.S Jayne, Robert J. Meyers and James Nyoro.
    This paper identifies the effects of NCPB's activities and government maize trade policy on maize market price levels and volatility. The paper also identifies the welfare implications and distribution effects of these policies 

    Download the paper (pdf)

    Paper 2. - Wp19-Staple Food Consumption Patterns in Urban Kenya: Trends and Policy Implications: Muyanga M, T.S Jayne, Gem Argwings Kodhek and J Ariga.

    Download the paper (pdf)

  • 1. Concept on Conference

     2. Presentations

     3. Policy Briefs

     4. Working Papers

     5. Conference proceedings(pdf)

  • Tegemeo Hosts 3rd ReNAPRI Annual Stakeholders Conference, 10th - 11th November, 2016

    The Regional Network of Agricultural Policy Research Institutes (ReNAPRI) is a regionally coordinated network of several national agricultural policy research institutes and Universities across Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region. The network currently has a membership of about 10 countries (e.g. Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, DRC, and South Africa). Formed in 2012, ReNAPRI was created at the initiative of the national agricultural policy institutes to allow for effective coordination, share information, collaborate on providing solutions to the common challenges facing the ESA region, and enable national policy makers to learn from the experiences of other countries within the region.

    As provided, the main objective of ReNAPRI in ensuring effective coordination, sharing of data, collaborating in providing solutions to common challenges and sharing experiences and learnings across countries is noble and members look forward to realizing the expected benefits through this Network.

    Over the last one year, members of ReNAPRI have been carrying out research to unfold agricultural transformation in Africa, identify market oriented and sustainable intensification strategies for addressing climate variability and analyze both the regional and global outlook and scenarios. The Network has also looked at both public and private sector responses to the 2016/17 drought. The findings of this research were shared during a 2-day conference held in Nairobi Kenya.

    The conference was the Third Annual Stakeholders Conference hosted by the network in different member countries to discuss issues pertinent to the future of African agriculture. The first Annual Conference was held in 2014 in Lusaka Zambia, the second one in 2015 in Maputo Mozambique and the third is being held in Nairobi Kenya. Tegemeo Institute of Egerton University, as a member of the ReNAPRI network hosted this year’s Conference whose theme was “Anticipating Africa’s Agricultural Transformation Pathways in the Context of Climate Change: Lessons from the Current Regional Drought”.

    The Network, through its Annual Stakeholders Conference, seeks to engage both public and private sector stakeholders through dialogue on the future of the region’s commodity markets e.g. maize, wheat, rice and sugar, among others. The conference brought together key stakeholders comprising of local, regional, and international delegates to deliberate on, and seek for strategies that will spur growth in the agricultural sector in the region. 

    See More here...

    View the conference Video here... 

  • Date: February, 8th 2017

    Venue: Sarova Panafric Hotel

    Given that majority of Kenyan farmers are small-scale producers characterized by small land holding and limited use of modern technologies, there is no doubt that the sector will bank on appropriate innovations to increase agricultural output against the ever increasing demand for food.Adoption of improved seed varieties is widely recognized as a key driver in improving productivity and addressing food security. In recent years, technological advancement has led to increase in the number of higher yielding varieties that are able to perform optimally under different ecological environments. For example, there now exists more than 250 maize hybrid varieties in Kenya. However, the expected gains from adoption of these varieties has not been realized. This puzzle is partly explained by low use of complementary inputs such as fertilizer and poor agronomic practices.

    Since 2012, researchers from Tegemeo Institute of Egerton University and the University of California, Davis have been undertaking a study on adoption of new hybrid maize varieties in mid-altitude Kenya. Preliminary results of the study are now ready for sharing with a wider audience for discussion and feedback. The research has implications for both seed systems and policy interventions for promoting technology adoption.

    It is against this backdrop, that the research team organized a one day conference titled “Enhancing Small-holder Productivity in Kenya: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial of New Seed Varieties”. The conference will bought together policy makers, private sector, civil societies, practitioners, researchers of agricultural development, among others to discuss Kenya’s seed systems. 

    Presentations:

    Diversity of Production Environments and Practices by Dr. Mary Mathenge, Director Tegemeo Institute

    Productivity Profile under Different Technology Bundles by Dr. Tim Njagi, Research Fellow Tegemeo Institute

    Filling a Niche? Findings from an Impact Evaluation of Maize Hybrids in Mid Altitute Zones by Prof. Michael Carter, Director, BASIS Research Program UC Davis, USA

    How do Small Scale Farmers Learn About New Agricultural Innovations by Asst. Prof. Emilia Tjernstrom, University of Wisconsin, USA

    View the Conference proceedings here...

    View the Conference Video Snippets here... 

  • The Conference 2017 Participants

    The Institute held a successful two-day biennial policy conference under the theme “Transforming Agriculture for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Livelihoods”, to share its research findings and facilitate dialogue among stakeholders on the way forward for transforming agriculture.

    Conference research findings and discussions revolved around the thematic areas of productivity and input use, sustainable livelihoods and inclusivity in agriculture, consumption and welfare as well as how we can harness technology for sustainable agriculture transformation.

    Deliberations were made to seek for strategies that will continue to move the agricultural sector and the nation at large forward. The agricultural sector plays a key role in Kenya’s food security and overall economic growth. The sector is a key driver of the economic pillar of the Kenya Vision 2030, contributing about a third of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. Despite this critical role, the sector continues to face many challenges that include low agricultural productivity, unsustainable production systems, low input use, high input costs and climate variability and change.

    In a devolved system, and to continue playing its critical role in the economy, agriculture must be transformed to cope with the changing production, marketing and policy environments, and hence ensure broad, inclusive and sustainable growth. In addition, stakeholders need to consider agriculture’s contribution to food and nutrition security in a holistic manner.

    The Conference participants were drawn from the public sector, private sector organizations, civil society, development agencies, universities, and research institutes, among others.

    Conference Proceedings

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